Posts tagged ‘Equality’

Free John (Psychiatric Prisoner)…Action Requested: via Beyond Meds

Sometimes blogs like this give us the opportunity to do much more than offer up snapshots from  our fairly ordinary lives or our opinions on the state of the world around us. Just as with every word we speak out in the real world, we have a multitude of opportunities to say something that matters. When someone’s words offer us a chance to become a part of the solution, those words become an action whether in speech, on paper or in the glow of our screens — and that is why I so often visit and repost from Gianna Kali’s Beyond Meds.

The following is lifted entirely from Beyond Meds. These are Gianna’s words not mine. I say that to give credit, not to separate myself from it as there is nothing in the post that I do not fully endorse. That’s why it’s here.

John Hunt is a trauma survivor with a diagnosis of ‘paranoid schizophrenia’. He has spent over four years locked up in Carraig Mor psychiatric treatment centre in Cork city, Ireland.

He has been over-medicated on an array of psychotropic medications with dangerous adverse effects. He has had tardive dyskinesia, akathasia and has developed incontinence. His physical/ mental/ emotional/ spiritual health has been severely neglected and has deteriorated since being in Carraig Mor.

He has had no access to a rehabilitation team or psychotherapist and no day release in two years. There are no plans to rehabilitate John and return him to the community where he belongs. He is merely maintained and contained. John and his family have no voice in relation to his future. We are afraid that John’s physical health is being damaged considerably. We cannot stand by and watch this happen any longer.

Sign the petition to free John Please take action here.

Facebook cause: The incarceration of John

The blog: The incarceration of John

Check back later for more links. Grainne is being swamped with calls from reporters today, but she will update me with more links when she is able. Please look a the other work Grainne has done for this blog as it’s extremely inspiring and will also shed more light on what is happening to John.

June 21, 2010 at 9:14 pm

Kings County and the Death of Esmin Green: Still Outraged

Some time around 6:30 am, two years ago today, Esmin Green was involuntarily admitted to Kings County’s psychiatric ER where she was ignored for 24 hours, the last of which she spent face down on the floor — writhing at first and ultimately dying in the presence of  the staff members whose job it was to care for her.

Think about that as you glance at the clock, going about your day today — how far 6:30 in the morning seems from your lunch, the end of the workday, prime time television. Think about where you’ve spent your day and how it compares to where Esmin was all that time just two years ago.

I’m still outrageed, still disgusted that we live in a society that allows that and — as long as it’s just those mentally ill over there — accepts it. We’ve created a line and carefully keep who and what lies on the other side out of our sight –as if there really is an us and a them. There isn’t. As long as we have a class of people who can be treated by force we have a public that cares little about what happens to them behind closed doors but there is no class and public. There’s just us and what we do to others, we’re doing to one of our own.

The only real rarity in this story is that it was caught on video. If it hadn’t been you would never have known about it. It would just be another death in another psych hospital — with no one to cry foul. KCHC has been operating like this for decades and even now, in their costly new building, under federal monitoring and with new accountability policies in place — the abuses continue.

I’m going to Brooklyn today — to King’s County. I’m going in remembrance of Esmin Green and in protest of an institution beyond reform. I’m going to stand aside others who won’t accept the state of the system and are standing up in the streets, demanding change — and when I glance at the time, I’ll know I’m where I need to be. Will you?

Previous Related Posts:

Esmin Green Demonstration and Vigil (2009)

Kings County Hosital to be Monitored by Federal Judge

Sexual Assault by Kings County Employee

Kings County: A Call to Action

June 18, 2010 at 10:46 am

Australians Labeled Mentally Ill to be Held up to a Month Without Legal Review

How convenient it is to label someone mentally ill. You seldom have to worry about their rights. Whether legally supported or just socially allowed by way of a quiet acceptance (usually both), a label of mental illness separates you out to a lower and less free class. I know — it’s nothing I haven’t said before but until it changes, it’s not the kind of thing that goes without saying.

The Sydney Morning Herald reports that things could be changing for the worse for Australians deemed mentally ill. Again. Australia doesn’t exactly have a good track record in terms of protection and rights for people with perceived mental illness — and frankly anyone interested in preserving their rights to any kind of due process should be concerned.

Leading psychiatrists warn that the civil rights of mentally ill people could be severely eroded by plans to extend the length of time patients may be held in locked wards without legal review.

The NSW Mental Health Tribunal is poised to introduce a new system which will mean a patient can be detained for up to one month before their case is reviewed by a lawyer.

At present someone who is compulsorily detained for emergency psychiatric treatment is reviewed by a magistrate within a week or so of admission.

A week “or so” and now a month? Being locked in a hospital is no less a method of incarceration than being locked in a jail. If you’re allowing someone to sit behind a locked door for a month before determining whether there was any legal validity in doing so, the pretense of medicine and the presence of doctors don’t mean a thing. It’s the lock on the door that counts. This is a staggering blow to the idea of basic rights and liberties and aside from those obvious issues, a month of being held anywhere  against your will is going to seriously impact your well being, family stability, reputation and of course, your employment and finances. The world keeps going by outside while you’re locked up.

“The delay in independent review will mean that people with mental illness, and the public at large, will not be able to have the same degree of confidence that their rights will be protected in our psychiatric hospitals – and for no gain but a minimal dollar saving,” the doctors argue in a recent medical newsletter. “Abuses have occurred in the past … Reducing our vigilance can only increase the possibility of another Chelmsford or ward 10B type scandal”.

An associate professor of psychiatry at Sydney University, Anthony Harris, also opposes the changes, saying they are a cost-saving measure that will remove a ”quick way that a patient and their family can query the system”

There is no us and them. This is not just for the “mentally ill” to worry about. If anyone can have their rights stripped away by a label, then everyone should be wary of how easily that label could applied to them. History has taught us many things. Even the strictest of systems can be corrupted and abused, much less a system that leaves this much room for indiscretion and is so imbalanced as to disregard your rights from the start. It’s a crime that it happens and a shame how often we quietly allow it.

June 5, 2010 at 9:00 pm 2 comments

Kings County: A Call to Action

You may have heard — you should have heard — of a woman named Esmin Green. She was involuntarily admitted to the psychiatric emergency room of Kings County Hospital, a place already known for a long record of violence, sexual assault, abuses and neglect. Unfortunately for Ms. Green and countless others, when you are someone who is allowed be shoved into places against your will, you have no say about which places and what standards, if any, are upheld there. Esmin died face down on the floor of the psych ER after being neglected for more than 24 hours.

As a telling video of the staff’s complete and ultimately fatal disregard for her was released, they had little choice but to go into public relations overdrive. They agreed to make all kinds of policy changes and rules about accountability as if adhering to policy and truthfully recording their actions was something they were good at. Knowing that if you throw money at a problem people read it as care, they also built a $153 million replacement for the notorious G building where all of these abuses were happening. Not surprisingly, the horrors continue — even under federal monitoring. Kings County’s Building R is little more than a multi-million dollar snake pit.

Last year, I attended a vigil in Esmin’s memory and a protest of the hospital’s neglect and continued abuses against people labeled mentally ill. It was organized by We The People and was as successful as we might have hoped, though the work is not done. Survivors of psychiatric abuses had an opportunity to speak out — and what some of these survivors had to say is not to be missed. I heard from several people that have helped inform and shape my approach toward activism and human rights.

This year, two years after her death, We The People will not let it drop as the problem clearly continues and I intend to stand with them in protest of a place that, for all their talk and money, is clearly beyond reform. We need to stand in solidarity with those behind locked doors and let the ones with the keys know we’re watching. Come out June 18th – 19th and demand justice, choice and human rights in mental health, voice your disapproval of the current standard of care and show them that there is a growing opposition in the public. Human rights are universal and a diagnosis cannot be allowed to erode that or even worse — invite abuse. When we look back in the light of hindsight at an era that saw basic human and civil rights denied people labeled ill and how many times we’ve collectively turned a blind eye to staggering amounts of abuse, we will look back in disgust. At least I’ll know which side I was on.

See below fliers for details and feel free to copy, repost and display them in support of the event.

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May 22, 2010 at 9:51 am

Kendra’s Law — Five More Years?

Kendra’s Law, a controversial New York state law enacted in 1999 under the Mental Hygiene Law, is due to sunset in June. If you hear about it from both sides enough, it’s easy to overcomplicate things and muddy the waters but what it really comes down to is that Kendra’s Law enables the state to drug people who they think might become criminals. Kendra’s law is in place solely to allow the forced treatment of people deemed mentally ill using fear of violence, however unfounded, as its leverage. It enables the state to strip people of their rights based on a diagnosis. Last I knew, the constitution (at least on paper) applied to all of us and not just those the state deems mentally qualified to share in the rights it’s meant to guarantee. That is a very scary path to be on and make no mistake — we are on it.

While its future is unclear, Kendra’s Law might very well be extended for another five years but not without a fight from a grassroots organization (no, not that one — a real grassroots organization) formed to protect the rights of people regarded as mentally ill — We The People. I, for one, hope they are able to help turn things around. They’ve been making their presence and stance as advocates for rights in mental health known and are taking part in meetings with Assemblyman Felix Ortiz in an effort to help restore the rights and dignity of New Yorkers.

From the Legislative Gazette:

Bill opponents, such as We The People, a group describing themselves as survivors of psychiatric atrocities in the mental health system, said this bill would extend the reach of the law to further encroach upon the civil rights of those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds unfairly labeled as “mentally ill.” Especially, they said, because it removes a provision that requires a physician to testify at the court hearing.

We The People want another woman to be remembered besides Kendra — Esmin Elizabeth Green, a mother of six who suffered from depression. She collapsed on the waiting room floor of the psychiatric ward in Kings County Hospital Center in June 2008. She died soon after, unattended and unnoticed by hospital staff.

This incident is just one example of the mistreatment of the mentally ill, law opponents say, because the assisted outpatient treatment system amounts to coercion, oppression and “torture.”

I’m not sure why the author felt the need to put torture in quotes. It reads like undue editorializing to me — as if to say it’s a stretch to call it torture. There’s a reason there’s a survivor movement and it’s not because the system has a healthy way of dishing out a healthy version of care. These drugs wreak havoc on your body, alter your mind and take you over in so many instances and in so many ways.Of course, once you become someone for whom force is considered an option, these things are just details, secondary to your being kept under control. Force does something sinister that rights and law can’t quite touch. Where you were once a person worthy of care, you become a problem to be solved.

Lauren Tenney, a coordinator of We The People, said, “They designed this [assisted outpatient treatment] to make it sound nicer. It was designed to fool the public to make people think it stops people from killing people, but they’re just getting drugs and no support. The research is entirely flawed.”

AOT should be referred to as IOC, she said, involuntary outpatient commitment.

She said the law is coercive and denies people their civil rights because it forces people into taking psychotropic drugs without their consent and does not provide the proper therapeutic support.

“I’ve seen people tortured and dead from their medication,” said Tenney.

If you have something to say, sign on to add your name and voice to the action We the People are taking. Contact Assemblyman Ortiz directly. Time is limited. Do you really want the kind of guy who wants to ban salt in restaurants making decisions regarding your mental health rights? Probably not, but that’s the situation. Don’t let it happen while you sit quietly. If you think you’re out of reach because you don’t live in NY, think again. Forced treatment laws are being introduced or strengthened all over. This is not just an issue of mental health rights but basic human rights and civil liberties. Drugging to prevent crime? That’s one step too far and a decade too long.

May 7, 2010 at 9:41 am 1 comment

MDRI Releases Report on Rotenberg Center

Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI) whose simple slogan is “Disability rights are human rights” has issued a report on the abuses at Judge Rotenberg Center calling on the Special Rapporteur, The Obama Administration and the Department of justice in their effort to put a stop to the establishment’s longstanding abuses against children and adults in their alleged “care”.

You may remember my posting about JRC in the past. The abuses that occur there are astounding and I and many others are left wondering how such abuses can carry on without any outside interference from the governing bodies that are supposed to protect all of our citizens — certainly those among us most vulnerable to mistreatment. In its report MDRI rightfully calls this mistreatment nothing short of torture.

From MDRI’s front page:

Washington, DC – April 29, 2010 – Mental Disability Rights International (MDRI) has found children and adults with disabilities tortured and abused at a “special needs” residential facility in Massachusetts and has filed an “urgent appeal” with the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture to demand the United States government end the torture immediately.
MDRI’s latest report, Torture not Treatment: Electric Shock and Long-Term Restraint in the United States on Children and Adults with Disabilities at the Judge Rotenberg Center (JRC),documents the use of electric shocks on the legs, arms, torsos and soles of feet of people with disabilities – for weeks, months and sometimes years. JRC uses punishments as treatment and US advocates have been trying for decades to close the school and end these practices. The school also uses 4-point restraint boards, tying children to the boards while simultaneously shocking them for hours; mock assaults; food deprivation; shock chairs; isolation and long-term restraint. Residents at JRC are diagnosed with a variety of behavioral, intellectual and psychiatric disabilities such as autism, bi-polar disorder and learning disabilities.
Laurie Ahern, President of MDRI and author of the report, states, “The cruelty perpetrated against children and adults at JRC is psychological and physical abuse, couched in the name of ‘treatment.’ The severe pain and suffering leveled against residents there violates the United Nations Convention against Torture. And to the best of our knowledge, JRC is the only facility of any kind in the US – and perhaps the world –that uses electricity combined with long-term restraint and other punishments to intentionally cause pain to children with behavioral challenges and calls it treatment.”
MDRI calls on the Special Rapporteur, along with the Obama Administration and the Department of Justice, to end the abuses against people with disabilities at JRC. MDRI is an international human rights and advocacy organization dedicated to the rights protection and full participation in society of people with disabilities worldwide. Help us put an end to the torture of children with disabilities in JRC.

I sincerely hope this report and urgent appeal are not falling on deaf ears. MDRI presents a clear opportunity for the system to take a stand on institutional abuse and torture under the pretense of care. We need to stop drawing lines across which we’re willing to allow these things to happen. No perceived mental illness or disability can be allowed to take away our basic human rights. This is their chance to show us that human rights are universal. If they can’t do that, what are they good for?

May 3, 2010 at 10:30 am 1 comment

Judi Chamberlin: Her Life Our Movement

“People labeled with mental disabilities are largely invisible to the wider world. To the extent that they think of us at all, they usually think of us as a problem that somebody has to do something about and not as human beings, individuals, each one of us — deserving of human dignity.”  — Judi Chamberlin

This is a great video created by activist, artist and psychiatric survivor, Leah Harris. I met Leah in Brooklyn at a demonstration and vigil in honor of Esmin Green and in protest of her passing for lack of care in a hospital. Leah immediately impressed me with her outspoken determination and when she’s performing a spoken word piece, she has a gift for getting to the core of what she’s communicating. What I might say in a lengthy rambling post or conversation, she cuts to in a phrase.

Leah’s been bringing that sharpness, conciseness and strength to video editing as well lately. In this short video, she shows viewers what the mental health rights movement is to many of us and what the late Judi Chamberlin is to that movement. You’ll notice I didn’t say was. Anyone who has fought as hard for and had such an impact on such a movement that survives them will always be tied to it. Benjamin Franklin once said something to the effect of, “If you are to be remembered long after you die, either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. ” Judi did both. Some day, when we look back on this movement in the same peculiar light of hindsight as we view the fight for black civil rights, women’s rights and gay rights, Judi will stand out as one of its first and strongest figures. In addition to what she did directly and for its own sake, she inspired many — often at times and in places where inspiration was notably absent. I wish I would have been in a position to meet and work alongside her toward our shared purpose. Instead I am blessed to be in the good company of people she affected directly.

Madness Radio: Survivor Spoken Word Leah Harris

Madness Radio: Judi Chamberlin Psychiatric Survivor Movement

March 26, 2010 at 9:45 am

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